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the challenges of the uncertainty they will be facing as soldiers in a counterterrorism environment. it shows this environment they are facing is not precise and orally. the leader they have to be is empfide by the stampede and the circumstances are frequently confusing. the rain is blowing sideways, there is dark and ominous clouds and seems like it's gretting barely brighter as he goes forward. some of the parts of the organization are way ahead and some may or may not catch up. and you have a lightning bolt that is going off that you have to confront. well on behalf of the people up at west point, i want to tell you it's been our pleasure and honor to be able to teach the cadets that are there that are understanding more and more of what they have to confront with regard to terrorism and terrorists and they are up to that task. last summer my son happened to be graduating with the class of 2012. the class of 2012 picked for their class motto for more than ourselves. i think that that reflects the generation of young men and young women that are coming to the military academy at west point
in international environments to help promote humanitarian missions. fleet week got involved with a humanitarian mission back in october in the earthquake in van, turkey. there's a heavy kurdish in san francisco and the ... better recover from their event and how to better prepare in the future from the katz traufk event that had taken place would not occur. we got a phone call at the fleet week association to ask if we could help bring together some resources and leet a fact-finding mission and we did that. one of our panelists is up here, second from your left, rob dudgeon, he's with the department of emergency management and he's the director of emergency services. rob's organization has been instrumental in creating the program that we have from back in 2010 all the way through to today and i know in the future we're already talking about putting together a hot wash of everything we've learned through 2012's fleet week. so rob is going to talk about the van, turkey mission. from turkey we have rear admiral guereva he has more than 14 years sea-going experience serving across various frig
afghanistan will have the right environment for conducting elections without interference and without undue concern. we also discussed in a bit of detail and in the environment that we have all aspects of the bilateral security agreement between afghanistan and the united states, and i informed the president that the afghan people already have given their approval to this relationship and value it as one that is good for afghanistan. in that context, the bilateral security agreement is one that the afghan people approve, and i am sure we will conduct it in detail where both the interests of the united states and the interests of afghanistan will be kept in mind. we had a number of other issues also to talk about during our conversations, and perhaps many times in that conversation, beginning with the composition of, of course. i thanked the president for the help that the united states has given to the afghan people for all that we have gained in the past 10 years and that those gains will be kept by any standard while we're working for peace and stability in afghanistan, including concern
and how to give actionable advice requires knowing, and i would argue working in, environments that require close cooperation. that is why our job is not to wait for legal questions to be brought to us or to provide advice on operational decisions after those decisions have been made. our job is to be present at the beginning and throughout the process. just like other senior national security official across the government, the person in my seat, since the creation of nsd, has attended the morning terrorism threat briefing along with the attorney-general and the director of the fbi. just like the analysts and special agents who are working these issues, we aim to stay on top of the threat picture and to help devise tactics and strategies and tools for getting ahead of it. today its standard -- it is standard procedure for agents conducting counterterrorism investigations to consult throughout the process with attorneys and prosecutors in the national security division. that is to ensure that all potential avenues for destruction of a threat, intelligence gathering, investigati
business. the combination of policies that are not hostile to business and an environment which actually welcomes new businesses and new jobs is working. it is clear. in a competitive world, policies matter. companies have choices. job-creators have choices. that is why our work is far from done. that is why a top priority must be to continue new jersey's record of excellence in education and to fix problems where we are failing. in higher education, the task force led with skill by former governor tom kean has helped us develop strategies for making new jersey's institutions more competitive. we need to turn new jersey's universities -- including rutgers -- from good to great, because that will help us keep more talented new jersey students in new jersey and will strengthen the link between higher education and high quality jobs. at the heart of these reforms we need, of course, is the plan to make sure that new jersey's critically important medical and health sciences institutions remain world class. by merging rutgers and umdnj in the north and rowan and umdnj's stratford campus in th
-- the environment is not good for outgoing epa chief lisa jackson. we'll explain. first, uncertain future as well for the next big thing in commercial aviation. what are you doing? nothing. are you stealing our daughter's school supplies and taking them to work? no, i was just looking for my stapler and my... this thing. i save money by using fedex ground and buy my own supplies. that's a great idea. i'm going to go... we got clients in today. [ male announcer ] save on ground shipping at fedex office. ♪ [ male announcer ] some day, your life will flash before your eyes. make it worth watcng. introducing the 2013 lexus ls. an entirely new pursuit. >> bret: wildfires in australia top international news. it's summer down under and fighting fires there are difficult. 95 are burning in new south wales with 18 out of control. new rights for women in saudi arabia. king granted women 30 seats on the top advisory council for the first time. a big step in a country where women's lives are heavily restricted. women are not allowed to travel, work, marry or even be admitted to a public hospital without pe
fourchlg the taliban, to try to reshape the environment there, and to try to maneuver the various players in the region towards negotiated outcome because there was no military outcome. that seems not to have gone well. in the absence of that, what is the strategic course? the strategic course is now to minimize american vulnerability in these areas. not walk afrom afghanistan, as has happened in the past. try to give afghanistan some choices, but for security and to try to get away from what i think is the free riding problem where president obama is free riding on security, and not moving governments forward to get other stake holding in the rest of the country. i think the president has moved that security blanket in part to change the dynamic in the region. he is also committed to rebalancing attention on asia, and he is taking military forces out should they be needed for iran and other matters. this is a very shrewd, smart move that i think the wlous is making. >> now, what we're seeing here, as well, is that they -- we just -- we're told that there's a two-minute warning. they do n
unfortunately is not here to the -- today but is a:editor about the taliban and its environment southern afghanistan, and western pakistan. to get at them itself when the united states was puzzling over its resurgence in afghanistan as a military challenge that had been neglected in the years after the 2001 arab emirates that it presented itself as a grave dilemma to the obamacare administration so we try to provide the regularity about this phenomenon recognizing the cliche image of the of one i aid malaya and his band of fanatics was inaccurate and falsified the problem. said not to prosecute a particular view of the taliban but look at its diversity and aspects of the character fetter not part of american debate to. i am really proud of this book and peter whose leadership from new america has been a joy in my office to support him and watch him. the last thing i want to talk -- that i want to say is with the research is part of a much broader body of work that we engaged in it and hope your subscribers and readers as you are with foreign policy with conferences and publications, anyw
'neill at 9:00 tonight and signed the final agreement. we don't have that environment anymore. maybe that is good for the sunshine law but with intense media scrutiny and day-to-day negotiations it is tougher to get the deal done. i would like for them to go to camp david for one week. lori: with a chance to get spending cuts? will republicans have any leverage? >> there is opportunity to have responsible conversation. lori: that anything done? >> it is possible. the budget that was criticized the president has proposed drastic spending cuts and froze discretionary spending over five years not what democrats would be happy about what would follow if there was a deal. it is maybe a little less likely than one year ago but it is possible. lori: meno bernanke will leave at the end of the term. how will that unfolds? >> now -- now they say tim geithner will go to the head of the federal reserve. [laughter] i think he has had his do but it is a close relationship. it is with the entire board and not just the chairman. on lot of people have known them for a long time. lori: who will handic
's also worth noting that we're in a pervasive low interest rate environment right now and i'm concerned at some point, and we have been for successive quarters of us having an interest rate spike, if we have an interest rate spike and we've got inflation, all the loans outstanding, 85% by the way which the government holds, students have a heck of a time paying off the loans in a high interest rate environment, are we creating a debt burden on the students and being unfair to them at the end of the day and that's my main concern as far as this issue is concerned. >> susan, an alternative way to think about this, you don't automatically go to college and wait until you know exactly what you want to do or don't go at all. >> yeah, that's right. i mean, i think there's a case to be made if air not absolutely sure, you know, take your time. my wife, who is much smarter than prettier than i am you know, waited until she was 24, and really figured out what she wanted to do. went off to uc berkley graduated from straight a's and proved that, you know, you could benefit enormously. but there is
stable. and we went straight to helman and nimruz province. very complex dynamic environment that we were operating in but before i begin it talk to you about the operational picture, i just want to give you a snapshot of afghanistan. when we got there i want to set the frame here so you understand what we're dealing with. afghanistan ranged 180th out of 1 86 on the world bank list of developed countries. 20 percent of the babies won't reach their first year of life. there is a 44 year life span for your average citizen. it has a less than 20 percent literacy rate and girls in afghanistan will marry by the time they are 15 and will likely birth their second child by the time they are 20. so this is the long-term effects of violence and civil wars within a failed state by every measure. the marines who are currently still in southwest afghanistan, they are surrounded by very conservative culture. in 2010, this is not true now but narco trafficking and helman province alone was the fourth largest trafficker of heroin in the world. the taliban controlled the region and this is the
, a has been is missing but with children, have protection concerns in a can't environment or in an urban environment. and so we will look at that population and want to identify those, those people. sometimes people with medical conditions, they can't be treated in a camp. and makes them again more vulnerable and we will look at those populations. so it's kind of a broad array of vulnerabilities that we try to assess. >> ms. strack and, therefore, could you identify, we're talking about those who are eligible for consideration. there has been an identification of an emphasis on those who have participated in assisting the united states efforts either in the military intelligence, otherwise, nongovernment organizations have been put themselves into some peril. what is the distinction between those who are humanitarian versus those who have performed to the benefit of our interests and are therefore being given consideration because of the exposure that may result from that service? >> i would say the programs working in several ways to address both humanitarian concerns and those who work
presentations. we tend to work in rural areas comes i'm happy to hear about urban environment and what's going on. two questions for lives. i have recently chose to the ghostly the ghostly causa schemata was interesting is how communities are popping up across the street. somewhat ironic that are in fact there's no services out there. i'm wondering in the long term from its landing% is, communities, huge communities in areas with little resources, what is the long-term plan for these communities that do also include sort of the dwellers to vent hopes for what they want to be living. that's the first question. to bring services to them for help relocate again and how does that work? the second question -- i was sort of in knowing how you got to where you got to. i feel it in the spaghetti or is so often the government is not interested in addressing because there's so many entrenched and powerful interests. so i'm interested in knowing more about how you saw that movie forward. >> i'll answer your second question first because it's a little easier, which is included around the table with the pe
is summarize the threats we face in the broader strategic environment in which our counter-terrorism efforts take place. the death of osama bin laden marked a milestone in our efforts to defeat al qaeda. al qaeda's ranks have been decimated. more key leaders have been eliminated in rapid succession at any time since 9/11. virtually every major a al qaeda affiliate has lost its key leader or operational commander. more than half of their top leadership has been eliminated. al qaeda is on the ropes and continues to get pummeled. however, his death and the capture of many other al qaeda leaders and operatives do not mark the end of al qaeda or its continued plotting against the united states and other countries. the preeminent security threat to the ad states remains al qaeda and its adherents. since september 11, the counter- terrorism effort has been aimed at preventing the counter terror -- the counter efforts of al qaeda on the homeland. al qaeda continues to edify operatives overseas and develop new methods overseas to attack us at home. affiliated movements have taken us beyond the core l
in the state of the union to work together. we have tried to create an environment where we would be able to work on things that have historically been challenging, but i think we need to do both. >> i think i am out of time. >> we will get the clock fixed. >> thank you for your service, mr. chairman. i want to draw attention to the last time you came before this committee. it was an unusual time were you did not just talk about a balanced budget, but as you referenced, you working with president clinton and this conference -- and this congress produced a balanced budget, something that no other president before or since has done in decades. our republican colleagues, when they took over instead of building on that success, they squandered that success. they never met a tax break that they did not like and they believed in the alchemy that those tax breaks would not for pay for themselves. that in addition to the tax breaks that they advanced, they advanced one increase in spending after another, increasing spending at an incredible rate without wanting to pay for it. after eight years of
for the women to be heard. it's an old boy's network and some describe it as a hostile work environment toward women, that the president does some business and bonding at his basketball games which are all male and there's a way that you could sort of set yourself up to be arm's length from the top women in the white house, to when you get to the big decision making moment, oh, i just don't know any top qualified women. >> well, i think one of the challenges he has, you have to look at him, the father of two minority women, and in the case of even my own family, my father, while he makes great, you know, tries to try to include more women he's naturally in most cases gravitates toward men, the same way i gravitate towards other women talking about challenges in my life. and that's one of the challenges that corporations and law firms are looking at heavily, how do we address this in a way that men and women are comfortable relying on each other. book to pipeline, hillary clinton did raise a daughter and did so with a lot of help around and a lot of women going into the senior roles are having
of the association of southeast asian nations will start next wednesday. >> translator: the strategic environment has been changing drastically in the asia pacific region. it is crucial that japan strengthen its cooperative ties with asean members to secure peace and prosperity in this area. >> suga denied suggestions from the media that china's expansion in the south china sea is the main reason for the visit. he and prime minister abe want to firm up economic partnerships with these fast-growing asian countries, which are leading global economic growth. >>> senior officials of the ruling liberal democratic party and it's coalition party have agreed on abe's economic stimulus plan. the agreement came on thursday at a meeting attended by abe who is also the ldp leader and new komeito leader, natsayama guchi. abe calls the stimulus the first in a series of measures to avoid the economy's freefall and promote private sector investment. one of the three pillars of the package is projects for post- disaster rebuilding and disaster containment. these will include road repairs and making school buildings q
to live in the privatized environment and not care about the civic situation. that is truly damaging to the possibility of already beleaguered ideals. nothing is simple. i cover the former soviet union and russia. i could go on at great length about how boris yeltsin undermined democracy and became a hero democracy. lech walnsa in many ways was not the. working bloke many made him not to be. gorbachev was a visionary who came to power. he saw he needed to change the country. he used his powers to do that. he withdrew from afghanistan. he called for nuclear abolition. he worked with ronald reagan. he understood you need political solutions, not military solutions. when the soviet troops were ready to come out of the barracks so the berlin wall would not come down, he told them to stay in the barracks, the empire is going. we cannot be a country that will be one of glasnost and perestroika if we live the way we have. it is the 20th anniversary of the soviet union, the end of the soviet union. many people in russia blame him for the economic conditions in which they live. they blame him
enough people. and how do we get them in an environment in which nobody wants to serve and we have a hard time making national security decisions about what to do and make them honestly and intelligently. we've had a pretty lousy record of making intelligent decisions about national security in the last few years. >> i just think it's fascinating that we're now in a position where we need to be transitioning from being a military that is making all of its decisions about dwell time and how much time you got between deployments and who is going to deploy where and when to instead thinking about a mill they're is not at war, that needs to decide what its strength is going to be, its training requirements, its weapons systems are going to be. and the last time we did this really is after vietnam and we've got all these vietnam guys. >> you're absolutely right. if you talk to a guy like marty dempsey, chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, and you get him against the corner and we're inside the cone of silence and he'll tell you honestly what he believes, he will tell you that one of the majo
care, but economics, education, climate change, the environment. i think you see a lot of different opinions and thoughts and ideas of how to get sun and how we find compromise in the united states senate. >> host: how did that play out in the number of leadership roles in congress? >> guest: is a great place to be. we have a new number and then in the senate serving as chairs of committees. in fact, senator barbara mikulski is the first woman to serve as the chair of the powerful appropriations committee and how that would change dynamics of the committee will see in the years to come. dianne feinstein in charge of intelligence. barbara boxer, more and more. patty murray goes through the list on budgets. and on the high side, we now have seven women ranking on major committees in the house. i should remind you that the house republicans a course in the majority have zero win in sharing any major committees. in fact, they are all white and cherry age or communities that have one women sharing a minor committee and that happens to be the administration committee. so we feel we are in
assessments that might take against the various environments that the secretary mentioned. and we're engaged -- i've told you, we're engaged in planning to develop options against alternative futures. alternative future one collaboration or permissiveness all of which would have different requirements. >> you talk now possibility of training rebels -- >> i haven't heard that. that's not a request we've head. i don't know if they would have don't that request through some other channel. [inaudible] >> we're not working on options that involve boots on on the ground with, you know, i think you have to keep the possibility that if there is a peaceful transition and international organizations get involved they might ask for tax in that situation. but in a hostile situation, we're not planning for that. >> back to general dempsey, i asked whether there was militarily anything there was the u.s. could do to stop the assad regime from using chemical weapons. >> the act of preventing the use of chemical weapons wash almost unachievable, jennifer, you have to have such clarity of intelligence, you k
, these are women who have either come out of this environment, out of an urban center in particular. we have our own struggles in the rural parts of america. we need to bring these things to the discussion. that is what we need to do. i do not think we will find solutions to the questions that the caller had until we get those people living with the struggles of the table. that means more women, more african-americans, more hispanics, more men and women of color. i feel strongly that we need more women in this discussion. we're still sitting at 20% of congress. we have a long way to go. host: caller in richmond, democrats line. caller: i was wondering how we will ever get equal pay when states like virginia have the right to work law and they can fire you for any reason. and the company i work for, if you discuss what you make to another employee, you can get fired. guest: it is about laws. laws are made by elected officials. who is representing us at the state legislature and in congress matters. we can overturn right to work laws. and we can pass it will pay laws. we need the right people to s
world environment. and the lingering allegations of corruption, nepotism, hangs over his head. >> his brother and father were assassinated, so in some ways he's also trying to stay alive in that country. and facing that possibility, as well. it's been a contentious relationship with karzai over the years. he's had better relationships with some of the generals there like general stanley mcchrystal than he has with others. and i talked with pentagon officials yesterday who were saying they weren't sure how these meetings were going to go because you just never know when you're dealing with president karzai what you're going to get. and in fact i even e-mailed a couple days ago the folks i met in afghanistan during previous trips and they were somewhat concerned, as well, saying they weren't exactly sure what karzai was going to say while he was here with president obama because a lot of people in afghanistan especially some of the leaders there still very much want u.s. troops because they're fully aware that the afghan forces are not going to be ready by the end of next year. >> absol
't need because of the change in the geopolitical environment the stealthy helicopter or the high end artillery. based on what you're seeing in the geopolitical situation, what does that mean future investment. what should be we investing in what should we continue to buy more of? less of. are there vampire programs with using your phraseologies that should be cut? what is the geopolitical environment mean for investment? >> well, again, my friends in the army are mad at me. unfortunately, i think there is here a shift what was the phrase bob used longer, large, basically large prolonged -- [inaudible conversations] >> yeah. that's a good prediction today. who in august of 2001 reconduct -- predicted we would have one in afghanistan? i think it's a dangerous thing in the business. it seems to me to that we needs to strengthen our maritime capability in the western pacific and not to contain china or fight a war with china, god for bid. i think the goal has got to be to try to sustain the peaceful situation, which is only thirty years old. it's the -- we have a huge interest, i think,
a short break. if you feel like you work in a toxic environment but don't know what to do about it -- how is that for a segue? ken linder written a new book called "your killer emotions." best way to navigate your way is to keep emotions in check. we'll talk to him, up next. geico's emergency roadside assistance is there 24/7. oh dear, i got a flat tire. hmmm. uh... yeah, can you find a take where it's a bit more dramatic on that last line, yeah? yeah i got it right here. someone help me!!! i have a flat tire!!! well it's good... good for me. what do you think? geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. >>> everybody has a moment where you get upset and you do something you regret. our next guest says he knows how to control those urges and lead to a successful personally at work. he has a new book "your killer emotions: seven steps to mastering the toxic impulses that sabotage you." good morning. >> good morning, soledad. >> i'm guessing you work with hostile people on both sides of the negotiation and there are lots of people who think anger and emot
the right environment for conducting elections without interference and without undue concerns in that regard for the afghan people. we also discussed in a bit of detail and in the environment that we have all aspects of the bilateral security agreement between afghanistan and the united states, and i informed the president that the afghan people already in the -- called for the strategic partnership agreement between us and the united states have given their approval to this relationship and they value it as one that is good for afghanistan. so in that context the bilateral security agreement is one that the afghan people approve and i'm sure we will conduct it in detail where both the interests of the united states and the interests of afghanistan will be kept in mind. we had a number of other issues also to talk about. during our conversations and perhaps many times in that conversation beginning with the conversation of course i thanked the president for the help that the united states has given to the afghan people for all that we have gained in the past 10 years and that
. they're expensive. we're in a very cost sensitive environment still. people are losing their jobs. not just this year, all around the globe. they're saying i will not pony up, 1500 bucks, 800 bucks get it with bells and whistles you're talking about $1,000. they're not willing to do it. they haven't seen the offerings to --. lori: you could use your tablet or smartphone. >> exactly. that costs a lot less. you can buy a cheap google tablet for 199 bucks. lori: stick around we want to get your reaction to our next story here. >> great. melissa: that big company in the world, has its sights set on china. apple's tim cook says he expects to take over china as the second biggest market. company says sales in china more than doubled in 2010 and dwef ven. apple's biggest challenge in china is the smartphone market which is currently dominated by google's android system. when do you think china overtakes the u.s.? do you that is near term? does he think, next five years or is that like a 20 years? >> i don't think so. three to five years it will happen. there are still so many people who
today it will still be a dangerous environment. we will still need to do force protection, but the mission will change this is how we start to leave and it will happen as of this spring which is a surprise. faster than anybody said it would happen. now, the justification for speeding up the way out, i have to admit, is a little holey. holey with an "e," not ah. this is because of the progress that's been made in terms of after began security forces, capacity to take the lead. i don't really know anything about the strength of afghan security forces and neither do you, unless you are just back from the war, which case, welcome home. but the pentagon's report to congress on that subject which reportedly was ready before the election this year, but did not get released until after the election for some reason, the official u.s. pentagon report on the readiness of afghan security forces, far from afghan security forces ready to take the lead, out of 23 afghan army brigades, only one of those 23 brigades capable of operating independently without support from international or u
be a dangerous environment, that we will still need to do force protection. but the mission is going to change. this is how we start to leave. and it's going to happen as of this spring, which is a surprise, which is faster than anybody said it was going to happen. now, the justification for speeding up the way out, i have to admit, is a little holey, not holy as in ahh. president obama saying the acceleration was possible in part because of what has been made in terms of afghan security forces, their capacity to take the lead. i don't know anything about afghan security forces, and neither do you unless you're newly back from the war, and welcome home, but the pentagon's report on that suggest which was reportedly ready before the election this year, but did not get released until after the election for some reason, the official pentagon support on the readiness of afghan security forces says far from afghan security forces being ready to take the lead, it says out of 23 afghan army brigades, only one of those 23 brigades is capable of operating independently without support from internationa
environment. which renewables in particular do you see having that sort of potential? is it wind, solar, wave, geothermal? >> the kind of numbers i'm talking about, you double energy demand in the world and supply 30% of it from renewables from say 1% or 2%. >> where will it come from? >> certainly wind is part of that, maybe solar -- there's some optimism there's in breakthroughs potentially coming there. i think ultimately hydrogen may be on the table as part of that answer. i will say all of these are important. all of these potentially fill some of that space. they all need additional technology applied to them and we have to come down the cost curve. it's always interesting to look at what we as a company do. i'll tell you our focus right now when it comes to the emissions space and the idea why we would push renewables, our focus is around carbon -capturing storage and around biofuels, particular types of biofuels that meet this low co-2 potential standpoint. and we have a wind business but to be perfectly frank, it's not growing very fast. >> i hope we'll come back to this but let's mo
they're low you're comparing them to a pristine environment that was the wilderness but the level you're finding are lower than what we would find in most cities. >> right now, well these are wilderness lakes we should say. these lakes are anywhere from 30 kilometers or sorry, 60 miles to 60 miles away from the major source. you have to fly into the lakes typically with a helicopter or something. they're not right no the oil sand operation. what is i think important to say, if you look at our most polluted site, which is about 15 miles let's say approximately from the major operation, if you look at that, that current levels would find in a city. what is different in many cities and many areas, these pollutants, specific ones we're looking at here, hydrocarbons are decreasing. what we're seeing they're increasing and if you look at predictions just from the oil sand development people themselves, they're estimating in the next 50 years they will increase 2.5 times or 150%. if you do back of the envelope calculation if nothing else changes very soon we'll be reaching levels that are qu
it to other people. be careful about your environment. bring purell with you restaurants. if you start to get the symptoms, stay home. >> that's a big part of it, isn't it? >> we were doing this report how it's $10 billion will be lost in people who call in sick because they have the flu, but what if people are coming into work who don't feel very well and suddenly just how easy is it to give it to somebody else? >> that's one of biggest problems, it's so contagious right now and the strains that are out there are so contagious and severe, that if you have symptoms and you go to work, there's a very good likelihood you'll give it to other people. and it doesn't feel good when you give it to friends and family. if you are sick, don't go to work and don't go to school. stay home, drink a lot of soup and tea and catch up on dvr. >> because of the severity of the situation, i was shocked to hear this, the archdiocese of boston and they feel they have a health emergency is telling priests they can suspend distribution of communion and alter sign of peace. and the shocking fact, the average desk is
. >> it will be fun. it's got a lot of tradition. it will be a great environment. former raider warren sapp. sapp played with raiders a seven time all pro. larry allen spent most career with the cowboys. a mammoth in one of the strongest men in the history of the league. former raider wide receiver tim brown is also on the list. just after firing rob ryan, cowboys hired monty kiffen, kiffen spent seasons running usc seasons. and he decided to go back to nfl. he does have 13(ué5tm of nfl experience, to nba, warriors lost two in a row to try to stop the skid tonight hosting in ora cell this evening. blazers led by a rocky out of oakland. kind of off the radar. doesn't get a lot of national attention. he's gotten everybody's attention. a tear drop there, smooth. so poised and warriors coach not surprised at his success. >> we thought highly of him. he's the best point guard in the draft. just ability to give way once on the floor no. surprise what he's doing. quality kismd noi? found himself as point guard to build on for a long time still to come. >> damion will yard with play. and what a rookie.
was in college. it's got a lot of tradition. it will be loud and great environment. >> larry: secondly round of the sony open rainbow good shot of the day. second shot, 155 yards out. three bounces and it is going, going, gone! eagle. here is a bogey 3. eagle on 18. six under 64 he tied for second. >>> that is wrap on morning sports. have a great weekend everybody. i'm larry beil. >> katie: coming up next, a surge of activity at flu klichbs and new warning for women as thieves get violent in an effort >> katie: cdc says a nationwide flu outbreak is spreading. california is green has not been hit yet. the outbreak is worse highlighted in red. heather ishimaru shows us what is being done to prevent a major outbreak here. >> these flu vaccines are last available at kaiser fafls. >> there are certain types of the vaccine we have no longer available. >> there is still enough available to pharmacies and doctors' offices but they have use most of the 3.5 million doses purchased by the hospital. >> we are looking to find vaccine that is still available on the market. most of flu vaccine have been pu
in afghanistan? thank you. >> the interment of the -- environment of the narcotrafficker forces in uncertainty. when they raise an orchard or vineyard and turns it into a poppy field -- when he is not sure what is learned happened to him or his family, they turn to narcotics. it takes three months to grow it. it does not need refrigeration or economic integration, nothing. if we see an increased degree of uncertainty, we would probably see more poppy cultivation. it would be listed economic activities. -- illicit economic activities. the leadership [indiscernible] in the areas where the economy is thriving, we have seen a reduction of narcotics and cultivation of the poppy. in areas where we see most of the fighting, that is where most of the poppies are grown. >> let me close with a final question. jim used a number of statistics. one that struck me is i have the right to a 52% of the afghan population thought the country is going on in the right direction. my question to each of you, what is your view? is the country going in the right direction and are you optimistic or pessimistic as we lo
, patty murray, borba boxer, chair of the environment. we have seven women now on the democratic side that are ranking members, and on the republican sign, every major committee is led by a white mail. in -- white male. in fact there's only one woman chairing a minor committee, and they fav her administration. what does this mean? women's leadership changes the conversation at these negotiations tables. there's a story of serving on the house armed services committee, and when they were talking about military reddiness, she and women like gabby giffords were there to ask questions about personnel and supplies, but also about mental health programs for the troops and their families at home. all of which is important for military readiness. and so you can't tell me that if we had two or three women involved in this fiscal cliff debate in the last month, that we wouldn't have gotten it done faster. i was at home over the holidays with my dad, and we all knew where we would end up. there were going to be tax increases. may have been at 300,000 or 4 hon thousand. there wasn't an american i
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